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World News: News

Sat 1 Dec, 2012
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"We can reach a point where virtually no children are born with the virus. And as these children become teenagers and adults, they are at a far lower risk of becoming infected than they are today," said Clinton.

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World AIDS Day 2012 more hopeful than the past

The United States has announced a plan to significantly reduce the global spread of AIDS. Advances in research and treatment of the disease has many officials feeling hopeful.
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According to the United Nations, about 34 million people worldwide are living with HIV, and 2.5 million were infected last year alone. In the United States, the Centers for Disease Control says there is an alarming rise in the spread of HIV among teenagers and young adults, with 1,000 new infections each month.

Yet public officials and health care workers say the world is nearing a turning point on AIDS, the disease caused by the HIV virus.

In advance of World AIDS Day [December 1, 2012], U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton outlined a plan calling for global efforts toward improving treatment and preventing the spread of HIV.

"We can reach a point where virtually no children are born with the virus. And as these children become teenagers and adults, they are at a far lower risk of becoming infected than they are today," said Clinton"

To read more on this article :


www.voanews.com/content/world_aids_day_2012_more_hopeful_than_in_past/1556378.html

 

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